Princeton bans academics from handing all copyright to journal publishers

Princeton
bans academics from handing all copyright to journal publishers

By
Sunanda Creagh, The Conversation, September 28, 2011.

http://tinyurl.com/3orpfva

 

“Prestigious
US academic institution Princeton University has banned researchers from giving
the copyright of scholarly articles to journal publishers, except in certain
cases where a waiver may be granted. The new rule is part of an Open Access
policy aimed at broadening the reach of their scholarly work and encouraging
publishers to adjust standard contracts that commonly require exclusive
copyright as a condition of publication.”

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MEASURING CONTENT QUALITY IN A PRESERVATION REPOSITORY: HATHITRUST AND LARGE-SCALE BOOK DIGITIZATION

7th International Conference on Preservation of
Digital Objects (September 19-24, 2010; Vienna, Austria)

Source: http://www.ifs.tuwien.ac.at/dp/ipres2010/papers/conway-20.pdf

 

MEASURING CONTENT QUALITY IN A PRESERVATION

REPOSITORY: HATHITRUST AND LARGE-SCALE BOOK

DIGITIZATION

Paul Conway

(8 pages)

Yale Library, Digitization, Hathi Trust

[From the article: For now, the cost and time required to digitize all of Yale’s volumes
exceed the library’s capacity, Gibbons said. But a growing digital community of
libraries can help the University move towards its goal of expanding access to
its holdings. “Companies that were doing big microfilming projects are now
doing big digitizing projects,” Reese said. “If the question was could all the
books in the Yale library be digitized, the answer is probably yes … Yale won’t
necessarily have to be the one to digitize them.” If another institution has
digitized a work also found in Yale’s print collections, for example, the
institutions might share access through the Hathi Trust. Based in Ann Arbor,
Mich. and operating in conjunction with the University of Michigan, the Hathi
Trust offers libraries across the country access to one another’s collections,
Pilette said. Yale became a member of the Trust in August 2010, when it became
the second Ivy League institution after Columbia University to join. Jeremy
York, project librarian for Hathi Trust, said most libraries choose to allow
unrestricted access to their materials in the repository, but Pilette said that
in some cases, copyright law dictates that only the affiliates of the library
that owns the print edition may access digital copies of those materials.]

UP CLOSE | A digital library?

Librarians
worldwide are adjusting to serve users in an age dominated by online resources
and e-readers.

Yale
Daily News – Sep 27 | Source:
http://www.yaledailynews.com/news/2011/sep/27/close-digital-library/

How Cognitive Science Can Improve Your PowerPoint Presentations

[From
the article
: Harvard cognitive scientist Stephen M. Kosslyn, who studies
how brains process images, wants to improve the world with his cutting-edge
research. And he’s starting with four ways to make your PowerPoint
presentations more human brain-compliant. …The Goldilocks Rule refers to
presenting the “just right” amount of data. Never include more
information than your audience needs in a visual image. As an example, Kosslyn
showed two graphs of real estate prices over time. One included ten different
numbers, one for each year. The other included two numbers: a peak price, and
the current price. For the purposes of a presentation about today’s prices
relative to peak price, those numbers were the only ones necessary.]

How
Cognitive Science Can Improve Your PowerPoint Presentations

By Annalee Newitz Feb 15, 2008 10:20 AM

http://io9.com/357063/how-cognitive-science-can-improve-your-powerpoint-presentations

Lessons From The Brain-Damaged Investor

[From the article: People with certain kinds of brain damage may
make better investment decisions. That is the conclusion of a new study
offering some compelling evidence that mixing emotion with investing can lead
to bad outcomes. …By linking brain science to investment behavior, researchers
concluded that people with an impaired ability to experience emotions could
actually make better financial decisions than other people under certain
circumstances. The research is part of a fast-growing interdisciplinary field
called “neuroeconomics” that explores the role biology plays in
economic decision making, by combining insights from cognitive neuroscience,
psychology and economics.]

JULY
21, 2005

Lessons
From The Brain-Damaged Investor

Unusual
Study Explores Links Between Emotion and Results; ‘Neuroeconomics’ on Wall
Street

Source: http://online.wsj.com/article/0,,SB112190164023291519,00.html