Amazon Debating ‘Netflix for Books’ Service

[From the article: Amazon was talking with book
publishers about launching a Netflix-like service for digital books, in which
customers would pay an annual fee to access a library of content, The Wall
Street Journal reported Monday, citing people familiar with the matter. It was
unclear how much traction the proposal has, the people said. Several publishing
executives said that they were not enthusiastic about the idea because they
believe it could lower the value of books and strain their relationships with
other retailers selling their books, they said.Amazon did not immediately
respond to requests for comment Sunday. The proposal was another sign that
retailers were looking for more ways to deliver content digitally as customers
increasingly read books and watch TV on computers, tablets and other electronic
devices.]

 

Amazon Debating ‘Netflix for Books’ Service

SEATTLE
– Amazon was talking with book publishers about launching a Netflix-like
service for digital books, in which customers would pay an annual fee to access
a library of content, The Wall Street Journal reported Monday, citing people
familiar with

 

 

 

[From mashable.com: The details about
the project are scarce, but it appears that the library would primarily contain
older works with restrictions on how many books a user can access each month.
The service would also be available to subscribers of Amazon Prime, a
membership program that gives users free shipping and access to movies and TV
shows for $79 per year. Amazon has been on a roll this year, having launched
Amazon Prime in February and a subsidized
version of Kindle
in May. The retail giant reported a 51% jump in revenues
for Q2 2011 and the fastest
growth
in a decade.  Source: http://mashable.com/2011/09/12/amazon-netflix-books/]

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Apple, publishers conspired against $9.99 Amazon e-books, says lawsuit

[From the article: “Terrified” by Amazon’s Kindle e-reader and
discounted e-book pricing, five major publishers allegedly acted together to
increase e-book prices and compel Amazon to abandon its discount sales
strategy. That’s the gist of a new class action antitrust lawsuit filed
in the US District Court for the Northern District of California by the Hagens Berman
litigation group
. The five book sellers named in the suit are
HarperCollins, Hachette Book Group, Macmillan, Penguin Group Inc., and Simon
& Schuster Inc, plus one more defendant: Apple. … The essence of the claim
is that these publishers, in coordination with Apple, conspired to nix the low
price e-books that Amazon launched in 2007. Amazon wanted to quickly gain
market share with its Kindle, the court filing observes, the first version of
which sold out in less than a quarter of a day. And so, capitalizing on its “first
mover” advantage, Amazon sold e-books at prices conspicuously lower than
physical books—many titles were made available for $9.99. This had to be
stopped, the class action charges.]

Apple,
publishers conspired against $9.99 Amazon e-books, says lawsuit

By Matthew Lasar | August
2011

Source: http://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/news/2011/08/class-action-suit-targets-apple-and-five-publishers-for-price-fixing.ars

Bookstream–New Cloud-based Library Delivers eBooks to Students

[From the article: This school year, educators will have a new option to deliver their books. In addition to handing out textbooks in class, they will deliver eBooks through the cloud to students’ iPads, smartphones, and laptops with a new online service called Bookstream. Bookstream, developed by Don Johnston Incorporated, makes it easy for educators to hop on the Internet, upload eBooks and share them with students for anytime reading. It was designed to help educators comply with IDEA 2004 (Individuals with Disabilities Education Act) that require schools to deliver core curriculum in accessible formats to support students with disabilities. “We work with assistive technology specialists who drive hundreds of miles each week to deliver eBooks on flash drives,” said Ben Johnston, Director of Marketing. “It’s ironic that eBooks are delivered by car, but as one special educator explained, there aren’t many alternatives—book files are often too big and unwieldy to email or download. She was also concerned about violating copyright laws and wanted an easier way to manage digital content. She inspired us to do something about it, and now we have with Bookstream.”]

Bookstream–New Cloud-based Library Delivers eBooks to Students

‎PR Web (press release) – 1 day ago

“Educators can set up their accessible library and deliver e-Books in less than 30 minutes,” adds Ben Johnston. “Our technology is similar to Amazon’s Cloud .

For Don Johnston company, see: http://www.donjohnston.com