Repair nerves using lasers

[From
the article
: In their study published today, Tuesday 20 September, in IOP
Publishing’s journal Biofabrication, researchers used lasers to create
intricate scaffolds, with features one thousand times smaller than a
millimetre, and demonstrated their ability to effectively harness the growth of
neuronal cells. The repairing of neural tissue – for example peripheral nerves,
spinal cord and the brain – has long been investigated using a technique known
as tissue engineering and is now becoming a realistic treatment as technology
advances.]

Lasers
Light The Path To Neuron Regeneration

September 22, 2011

 

 

Source for full article: http://www.photonicsonline.com/article.mvc/Lasers-Light-The-Path-To-Neuron-Regeneration-0001?sectionCode=News&templateCode=EnhancedStandard&user=2013325&source=nl:32003

US Gamers Crack Puzzle in AIDS Research that Stumped Scientists for Years

[From the article: Looking for a solution, researchers at the University of Washington turned to Foldit, a program created by the university a few years ago that transforms problems of science into competitive computer games, and challenged players to use their three-dimensional problem-solving skills to build accurate models of the
protein. With days, the gamers generated models good enough for the researchers
to refine into an accurate portrayal of the enzyme’s structure. What’s more,
the scientists identified parts of the molecule that are likely targets for
drugs to block the enzyme.]

US Gamers Crack Puzzle in AIDS Research that Stumped Scientists for Years

Fox News – ‎26 minutes ago‎

In just three weeks, online gamers deciphered
the structure of a retrovirus protein that has stumped scientists for over a
decade, and a study out Sunday says their breakthrough opens doors for a new
AIDS drug design.

Source: http://www.foxnews.com/health/2011/09/19/us-gamers-crack-puzzle-in-aids-research-that-stumped-scientists-for-years/

Jellyfish Genes Make Glow-in-the-Dark Cats

[From the article: First there were glow-in-the-dark fish, then rats, rabbits, insects, even pigs. And, now, researchers have inserted the jellyfish genes that make fluorescent proteins into Felis catus, or the common household cat.]

Jellyfish
Genes Make Glow-in-the-Dark Cats

By David Biello |
September
12, 2011