What Does the MFA Boom Mean for Print Books?

[From
the article
: “We
sell FAR more e-books that also have print counterparts than we do books that
are only available in electronic format…The perceived value of a book
that is in electronic and print formats is higher than one that’s a just a
throwaway, 99-cent e-book.” In other words, if vanity doesn’t keep authors
invested in print books, economic self-interest will. All that might seem
trivial, until you realize that the number of would-be authors in America is
skyrocketing—particularly among the younger generation. The number of
degree-granting U.S. creative writing programs has exploded from 79 to 854 in
the past 35 years. The average age of students starting these programs is twenty-six.
I’m lucky enough to be a student in one myself, and can attest anecdotally that
the goal of nearly every writer pursuing this degree is to see his or her words
realized in print book form]

What Does the MFA Boom Mean for
Print Books?

Austin Allen on September 22, 2011

For full article: http://bigthink.com/ideas/40313

Amazon brings Kindle e-books to 11,000 libraries

[From the article: That option got an extra push
Wednesday when Amazon went live with its library lending
program
, bringing Kindle e-books to 11,000 participating
libraries across the U.S. Customers with a library card will be able to browse
their local library’s website and borrow digital books, which will be sent
wirelessly to their Kindle devices and apps. You don’t have to have a Kindle
device to borrow Kindle books: The program works with Amazon’s Kindle apps,
which are available on a profusion of mobile devices, and with Kindle Cloud
Reader, the company’s new Web-based
offering
. Books can be borrowed for a set duration, typically
around two weeks, after which they are deleted from the borrower’s digital
collection. Libraries purchase licenses for the books they lend, which limits
the number of digital copies that can be “checked out” at the same
time. ]

Amazon
brings Kindle e-books to 11,000 libraries

By Deborah Brunswick @CNNMoneyTech September
21, 2011: 12:53 PM ET

Source: http://money.cnn.com/2011/09/21/technology/kindle_amazon_library/?source=cnn_bin

Next up for Amazon, an e-book rental library for readers?

[From the article: Amazon’s digital service would allow customers to pay an
annual fee to have access to a library of e-books for rent, according to a
report by The Wall Street Journal
, quoting people familiar with the plan.
Amazon is reportedly in talks with book publishers. Amazon officials were not
available to comment on the report.]

Next
up for Amazon, an e-book rental library
for readers?

‎You +1’d this publicly. Undo

TechFlash – Sep 12, 2011

Blog: Amazon
Reportedly Set to Offer New Kindle Digital Book Library

TFTS
(blog)

Amazon
Reportedly Considering ‘Netflix for Books’
‎ Sci-Tech Today

Creator of the ebook, dies

Michael Hart, creator of the ebook, dies

Telegraph.co.uk
Shane Richmond – 3 days ago

Hart,
who was 64, Hart wrote: “I am hoping that with a library this size that the average middle class

In-Depth: Michael
Hart, a Pioneer of E-Books, Dies at 64
‎ New York Times

Michael
Hart (1947 – 2011): Prophet of Abundance
‎ ComputerworldUK (blog)

Father
of the e-book was all about freedom of information
‎ Sydney Morning Herald

Amazon Debating ‘Netflix for Books’ Service

[From the article: Amazon was talking with book
publishers about launching a Netflix-like service for digital books, in which
customers would pay an annual fee to access a library of content, The Wall
Street Journal reported Monday, citing people familiar with the matter. It was
unclear how much traction the proposal has, the people said. Several publishing
executives said that they were not enthusiastic about the idea because they
believe it could lower the value of books and strain their relationships with
other retailers selling their books, they said.Amazon did not immediately
respond to requests for comment Sunday. The proposal was another sign that
retailers were looking for more ways to deliver content digitally as customers
increasingly read books and watch TV on computers, tablets and other electronic
devices.]

 

Amazon Debating ‘Netflix for Books’ Service

SEATTLE
– Amazon was talking with book publishers about launching a Netflix-like
service for digital books, in which customers would pay an annual fee to access
a library of content, The Wall Street Journal reported Monday, citing people
familiar with

 

 

 

[From mashable.com: The details about
the project are scarce, but it appears that the library would primarily contain
older works with restrictions on how many books a user can access each month.
The service would also be available to subscribers of Amazon Prime, a
membership program that gives users free shipping and access to movies and TV
shows for $79 per year. Amazon has been on a roll this year, having launched
Amazon Prime in February and a subsidized
version of Kindle
in May. The retail giant reported a 51% jump in revenues
for Q2 2011 and the fastest
growth
in a decade.  Source: http://mashable.com/2011/09/12/amazon-netflix-books/]

Internet archivist seeks 1 of every book written

[From
the article
: RICHMOND, Calif. — Tucked away in a small warehouse on a
dead-end street, an Internet pioneer is building a bunker to protect an
endangered species: the printed word. Brewster Kahle, 50, founded the nonprofit
Internet Archive in 1996 to save a copy of every Web page ever posted. Now the
MIT-trained computer scientist and entrepreneur is expanding his effort to
safeguard and share knowledge by trying to preserve a physical copy of every
book ever published. “There is always going to be a role for books,”
said Kahle as he perched on the edge of a shipping container soon to be tricked
out as a climate-controlled storage unit. Each container can hold about 40,000
volumes, the size of a branch library. “We want to see books live
forever.” …That’s far fewer than the roughly 130 million different books
Google Inc. engineers involved in that company’s book scanning project estimate
to exist worldwide. But Kahle says the ease with which they’ve acquired the
first half-million donated texts makes him optimistic about reaching what he
sees as a realistic goal of 10 million, the equivalent of a major university
library.]

Internet
archivist seeks 1 of every book written

Tucked away in a small warehouse on
a dead-end street, an Internet pioneer is building a bunker to protect an
endangered species: the printed word.

By MARCUS
WOHLSEN
, Originally published Monday, August 1, 2011 at
7:07 AM

Associated Press

http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/businesstechnology/2015790335_apuseverybookwritten.html

Apple, publishers conspired against $9.99 Amazon e-books, says lawsuit

[From the article: “Terrified” by Amazon’s Kindle e-reader and
discounted e-book pricing, five major publishers allegedly acted together to
increase e-book prices and compel Amazon to abandon its discount sales
strategy. That’s the gist of a new class action antitrust lawsuit filed
in the US District Court for the Northern District of California by the Hagens Berman
litigation group
. The five book sellers named in the suit are
HarperCollins, Hachette Book Group, Macmillan, Penguin Group Inc., and Simon
& Schuster Inc, plus one more defendant: Apple. … The essence of the claim
is that these publishers, in coordination with Apple, conspired to nix the low
price e-books that Amazon launched in 2007. Amazon wanted to quickly gain
market share with its Kindle, the court filing observes, the first version of
which sold out in less than a quarter of a day. And so, capitalizing on its “first
mover” advantage, Amazon sold e-books at prices conspicuously lower than
physical books—many titles were made available for $9.99. This had to be
stopped, the class action charges.]

Apple,
publishers conspired against $9.99 Amazon e-books, says lawsuit

By Matthew Lasar | August
2011

Source: http://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/news/2011/08/class-action-suit-targets-apple-and-five-publishers-for-price-fixing.ars